little music theory question

So I was just listening to Antonim’s Melancholy Soldier (http://www.notessimo.net/page/browse/songs.html/_/metal-rock/rock/melancholy-soldier-r73410), and I realized that in measure 55 he made the guitar play E, Gb, and B, while the piano plays A, D, and F. Why is it that this mix of notes sounds good, and not like the absolute trashiest thing ever?

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To be honest I think it has to do with the relative volumes, the guitar is pretty hard to hear so it doesn’t really add much dissonance.

I intended for the piano chords to sound more melodic, so they move around the staff a bit more than the other chords.

but still, why do the piano chords not interrupt the other chords?

there’s definitely dissonance. The difference is it’s an accidental in a melodic line. The dissonance is basically adding to the song, in your ear at least. imo it doesn’t sound good at that point.

aka the dissonance is the question and the piano afterwards is the answer

I downloaded the save file when I reviewed this song, and noticed that he had set the key signature to most of the melodic sheets to G major/E minor (that’s just F# btw). This automatically changes any Fs played to F#, thus solving the dissonance issue (which would be major if there was a tritone B and F together).

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Sorry for double post, but hey neat! There’s a best answer feature I never knew about :smiley:


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