Tutorials

Other suggestions welcome. Here’s a little example of #1 and #4.

https://www.notessimo.net/?id=512

1 Like

Example of chords. Should it be done like this? Feedback much appreciated.

https://www.notessimo.net/?id=516

so are all chords identified by the bottom note?

Not always, but for a standard major third chord, yeah. An inverted C will have the root at the top, making it seem that E is the root, so you can’t count on the lowest note being the root. You’re learning to play right? This is a pretty good resource.

don’t know if i’m allowed, but here’s a little tutorial about various things.

How To Make Notes Sound More Dignified:

(0th Sheet is Crappy Version)
(1st Sheet is more dignified version)
(2nd Sheet is me playing around)

To make notes sound more dignified, you’re going to want to…

Make it so that the melody comes out of one speaker and the harmony comes out of the other by panning (100% is the right speaker, -100% is the left speaker) (if 100% comes out of the left speaker, your speakers are the wrong way) Also, to make the drums sound less puny, put 3 of them on top of each other.

Feel free to mess around with this song
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https://www.notessimo.net/?id=4129

Tips For Good Songs

  1. Experiment. Use the low tones and the high ones.
  2. View other songs. Doesn’t it give you an idea?
  3. Use chords and some flats and sharps.
  4. Try to finish what you started with.
  5. Patience. Making a good song takes a while. That’s important.
  6. Ask someone for some help or to see what could be improved.

A simple tutorial to making a simple song for those that know a great deal of the theory of music but just can’t get used to making a song. Here’s an example:

https://www.notessimo.net/?id=5163

Here’s how I did that:

  1. I firstly made 4 high hat notes to time the beat to get the tempo I wanted. I chose 200. It’s entirely a matter of opinion.
  2. Secondly I made a simple drum loop then I mixed it up. This is all very simple stuff so far. Also, try not to go too Over-The-Top with the drum, try keep about 3 or 4 different drums at most per beat.
  3. Then I chose what key I want it to be in (click here for more information) and made a simple bass pattern over the four measures of drums I had.
  4. Now I added guitar (can be any other instrument you want - experiment to try and see what goes). I also added various chords that had notes that were playing with bass.
  5. This is really simple to see what I did here, I added a low Piano and sustained the notes.
  6. It’s time to decorate it a bit and see what I can add here
  7. I have to be honest, I don’t know if strings go very well this part. But anyway, I made sustained chords like the Piano, only it’s chord.

Also you may have noticed that I went off key at one part. But there are no definite rules of music - there’s just theories on how it will sound good. Just experiment and you’ll notice it’s OK to occasionally go off-key. But you MUST make sure it doesn’t sound too bad.

Ok Hypo, you seem to know a little about what you’re talking about, but it’s all basic, basic, basic. For starters, you completely screwed up your G “Major” scale. The standard G Major scale has a C NATURAL, not a C sharp. The way you wrote out the scale would imply that a B minor scale must follow, unless you think you’re Ornette Coleman. I would suggest you fix that right away, so as not to cause confusion amongst beginners 8-) .

As for you, Levus, you don’t go “Off-Key”, you merely expand on your overall progression. Take John Coltrane’s masterpiece Giant Steps. During his solo, he decided to punch off numerous minor seconds and tri-tones, all following his original progression. What you refer to as “Off-Key” is simply known as “dissonance” (which I’m sure you already knew). I’m trying to not sound like a complete dork, or asshole for that matter, I’m just letting you guys know that you shouldn’t teach if you have yet to learn.

Too late dude… too late.

[quote=“Guit_Pops”]The standard G Major scale has a C NATURAL, not a C sharp. The way you wrote out the scale would imply that a B minor scale must follow, unless you think you’re Ornette Coleman[/quote]I see no C# anywhere, anywhere. As for why I started on C in the first place–I can’t say, I guess I was going to start each example on middle C or something…

And I AM Ornette Coleman. Prove me wrong!

Sorry, I meant F sharp. A standard C Major scale should have an F Natural, not an F Sharp.

I KNEW IT!!! And I have just one thing to say - FREE JAZZ SUCKS!!!

dude it was g, not c , he didn’t start on g however.
I REPEAT!!! GET YOUR FACTS STRAIGHT!!!

Ok, I understand that he was trying to use a G Major scale as an example, I just want to know why the HELL he didn’t just START ON A G. By starting on a C and ending on a C, you completely throw the whole scale off. I can see that you are following the G Major scale, but come on…you’re trying to help newcomers, not make their songs sound like shit. I suggest you fix that tutorial to avoid any more flaming.

My real intent with that tutorial was to show how note duration works by providing a visible example. The F# was an afterthought, a foolish after thought. However, it still is G major, despite the quirkiness. I think in hindsight scales would be best presented by something like this. My tutorial’s title should be read “Note Duration that just so happens to be in G Major”
And calm down Heart.

Ok, but this brings up another point. Were you focusing on showing people how to write out scales or note duration? Combining the two into one is just a bit confusing…

[quote=“Hypo”]And calm down Heart.[/quote]Yes captain Hypo, Sir!

[quote=“Hypo”]My real intent with that tutorial was to show how note duration works by providing a visible example.[/quote]Caprice and folly! Again the scale was an afterthought. You would not believe how many times someone has asked why there is a blank measure in between sheets; the answer is rooted to note duration in as many cases as I can remember. No questions on scales. But I foresee a large group of Notessimo 2 patrons being unwashed cretins, not knowing a C7 from an Em7b9 (oh pretentious right?). If I am going to make a proper scales tutorial, you can be sure it will be by the books–not retarded.
Also, I reserve the right to be as confusing as is humanly possible.

Capitalize that “sir!” Insubordination!

Oh, ok, now I see the point in the scale. I was wondering myself why the game added extra measures sometimes. Now I can see that you just put in the scale to also give people an example of how a scale should be. Good job on the note duration, but maybe you should try a little harder on the scale 8-) .

Do you peoples prefer the tutorial on page 1 or this’un? I’m really trying to get across the reason blank measures appear because of long notes at the end of a measure; does it come across well? There is the method of exhaustion which I have yet to employ, and seeing some of the musically retarded patrons already on the site, I probably will have to resort to etching it into a tutorial with intelligence-insulting examples.

How to volume: First you must click on the red-boxed button to bring up the note settings window. Posted Image
Clicking said button will bring up the note settings window, which looks like this: Posted Image
Volume, boxed in blue, is set at a default of 100%. By sliding the little arrow/triangle thing below the 100% bubble to the left, you decrease the volume of any notes you place after you close this window. The furtherest left value is 0%, which will make all notes inaudible.
Inversely, sliding the arrow to the right increases the volume of any notes you place after you close this window. The furtherest right value is 300%, which will make all notes much louder (3x louder to be precise) than the default 100%.

Panning, boxed in green, controls from which speaker a note plays. As far as I know, this will have no effect on systems using sub-stereo systems. The default of panning is 0%, which means a note will play with equal volume from each speaker. By sliding the little arrow below the 0% bubble to the left, you increase the volume in your left speaker, while decreasing the volume in your right speaker. The maximum left-bound value is -100%, which means that sound will come from the left speaker only.
By sliding the little arrow below the 0% bubble to the right, you decrease the volume in your left speaker, while increasing the volume in your right speaker. The maximum left-bound value is 100%, which means that sound will come from the right speaker only.

Note Duration, boxed in yellow and red, controls how long a note is sustained. The lower the value in the red box, the shorter the note. By clicking on the yellow box, you will bring up a list of some preset note lengths. The default quarter note has a value of 16. Each measure has a total value of 64 units, which means that when evenly spaced, one measure will accommodate 4 quarter notes. You can set a note to any value between 0-1000 by typing the desired note length in the red box. The maximum value of 999 will hold for about 15⅔ measures.

When you have set all of these factors to your liking, click the “change” box at the bottom of the window to confirm your changes.


© 2007-2020 Jean-Denis Boivin